Tag Archives: archaeology

RadioCIAMS – Fiona Kidd

On February 24, 2017, NYU Abu Dhabi archaeologist Fiona Kidd met a panel of CIAMS students (Dusti Bridges, Betty Hensellek, Jeanine Hoy, Laryssa Shipley, and Jay Weimar) and faculty (Lori Khatchadourian, host) to discuss wall paintings and elite iconograhphy at the site of Akchakhan-kala in modern-day Uzbekistan. The discussion of approximately 45 minutes opens below.

RadioCIAMS – Steve Kosiba

On October 14, 2016 University of Minnesota archaeologist Steve Kosiba met a panel of CIAMS students (Kelli Breeden, Andrew Crocker, Perri Gerard-Little, Katie Jarriel, and Sam Sanft) and faculty (Adam Smith, host) to discuss materiality, constructions of value, and placemaking among the Inka.

In preparation for discussion, the participants read:

  • Bauer, A. and Kosiba, S. 2016. How things act: An archaeology of materials in political life. Journal of Social Archaeology 16(2): 115-141.
  • Kosiba, S. 2012. Emplacing value, cultivating order: places of conversion and practices of subordination throughout early Inka state formation (Cusco, Peru). In J.K. Papadopoulos and G. Urton, eds. The Construction of Value in the Ancient World. Los Angeles: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology. Pp. 97-127.

The discussion of about an hour starts below:

RadioCIAMS – Matthew Canepa

canepa-photoOn September 23, 2016 University of Minnesota archaeologist Matthew Canepa meta panel of CIAMS students (Gabby Borenstein, Andrew Crocker, Jeanine Hoy, Jake Nabel, Jessica Plant, Ellie Reppy, Andrew Smith, and Jay Weimar)  and faculty (Ben Anderson and Lori Khatchadourian, host) to discuss iconography, architecture, and the construction of royal identity in the Sassanian Empire.

The discussion of approximately one hour opens below.

Astrid Van Oyen wins Cotsen Excavation Grant

Professor Astrid Van Oyen, who joins the faculty of CIAMS in the 2016-2017 academic year, has been awarded a Cotsen Excavation Grant by the Archaeological Institute of America for her field project at the site of Podere Marzuolo in southern Tuscany (Italy).

The Marzuolo Archaeological Project (MAP) is an international and interdisciplinary fieldwork project investigating the rural craft site of Podere Marzuolo. Professor Van Oyen’s collaborators on the project include Gijs Tol (University of Melbourne) and Rhodora Vennarucci (University of Arkansas).

Professor Astrid Van Oyen (center) at the Roman site Podere Marzuolo.

Professor Astrid Van Oyen (center) at the Roman site Podere Marzuolo.

Preliminary excavations at the site were undertaken in 2012-2013 under the aegis of the Roman Peasant Project. Over the next five years (2016-2021), MAP will investigate how knowledge was shuffled, how a community of practice was formed around ceramic production, and how innovation happened. MAP seeks to challenge the stereotypical view of a Roman countryside occupied by conservative, isolated, and economically underdeveloped farmers, and instead focuses on the changing practices of a crafting community that is highly diversified, well connected, and actively innovating.

In situ pottery at Marzuolo.

In situ pottery at Marzuolo.

Congratulations to Professor Van Oyen on her award and what promises to be an innovative and illuminating research project!

Photographs provided by Astrid Van Oyen.

Hirsch and CIAMS Grants Awards – 2015/2016

CIAMS is fortunate to be able to provide a number of research and travel grants for our undergraduate and graduate students and faculty. For the 2015/2016 academic year CIAMS granted a total of $34,941 in Hirsch travel and CIAMS research grant awards. These grants facilitate travel and archaeological field experience as well as enabling graduate students to undertake self-directed archaeological research projects. As our program expands, we look forward to promoting even more projects that benefit the field of archaeology.

ISIS Increases the Destruction of Antiquities in Syria

The Islamic State released this photo of a detonation in the Temple of Baalshamin in Palmyra. Militant website, via The New York Times.

The Islamic State released this photo of a detonation in the Temple of Baalshamin in Palmyra. Militant website, via The New York Times.

This latest article by The New York Times describes the recent destruction of a fifth-century Roman Catholic monastery and one of the best-preserved temples in Palmyra, dated to the first-century. Both destructions, carried out by Islamic State militants, occurred in the same week in the same province in Syria.

The NYT has also updated the graphical analysis of the strategy behind ISIS’s destruction of ancient sites. Another article describes in more detail the destruction of the Temple of Baalshamin at Palmyra.

The latest destruction of Syrian antiquities follows close on the heels of the gruesome murder of archaeologist and former custodian of Palmyra, Khaled al-As’ad.