Spring 2017 – Awards won by CIAMS Members

CIAMS members have received a number of awards recently!

Gabby Borenstein, Anthropology PhD student, won a National Geographic Young Explorers Grant to support her dissertation research on “The Logistics of Egalitarianism: Materiality and Meaning in the Kura-Araxes Horizon (3500-2400 BCE).” National Geographic Young Explorers Grants assist aspiring professionals working on global research, conservation, and exploration projects. Gabby excavates at the Bronze Age site of Gegharot in Armenia along with the CIAMS-run Project ArAGATS. Congratulations, Gabby!


Liana Brent, Classics PhD candidate, received the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation/Samuel H. Kress Foundation Pre-Doctoral Rome Prize for Ancient Studies from the American Academy in Rome to support her dissertation research. Liana’s dissertation project is entitled “Corporeal Connections: Tomb Disturbance, Reuse, and Violation in Roman Italy.”  The Rome Prize supports innovative, inter-disciplinary work in the arts and humanities.  Congratulations, Liana!

 

 


Perri Gerard-Little, who recently defended her dissertation, entitled “‘A pleasure garden in the desert, to which I know no comparison in this country’: Seneca Iroquois Landscape Stewardship in the 17th and 18th Centuries” in the Anthropology PhD program, was awarded a Deanne Gebell Gitner ’66 and Family Annual Prize for Teaching Assistants from the College of Arts & Sciences.  Double congratulations to Perri for the award and a successful defense!

 


Kurt Jordan, CIAMS Director and Associate Professor of Anthropology, was named a Fellow of the New York State Archaeological Association at the recent annual meeting in Lake George. Fellows are honored for their “outstanding contribution to our knowledge of New York State Archaeology.” He is the 60th Fellow named in the 101 years of NYSAA’s existence.  Congratulations, Kurt!

 

 


Kaja Tally-Schumacher, PhD candidate in History of Art,  was named a Junior Fellow in Garden and Landscape Studies at the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection for Fall 2017. This appointment is in support of her dissertation “Cultivating Empire: Transplanting and Translating Rome.” Dumbarton Oaks supports research and learning in Byzantine, Garden and Landscape, and Pre-Columbian studies. Congratulations, Kaja!

 


If you know of anyone omitted from this list of awards recipients, please contact the CIAMS AD.

CIAMS and Hirsch Awards – 2016/2017

CIAMS is fortunate to be able to provide a number of research and travel grants for our undergraduate and graduate students and faculty. For the 2016/2017 academic year CIAMS granted a total of $37,877 in Hirsch travel and CIAMS research grant awards. These grants facilitate travel and archaeological field experience as well as enabling graduate students to undertake self-directed archaeological research projects. As our program expands, we look forward to promoting even more projects that benefit the field of archaeology.

 

CIAMS Lecture Series – Felipe Rojas

Abstract: This paper is a diachronic study of alternative and sometimes conflicting ontologies of landscape in ancient Anatolia. I am interested specifically in the notion that some mountains were animate, sentient beings and that the boundaries separating them from men and gods were susceptible of transgression. Although examples of personified mountains as well as of metamorphosis and petrification can be found occasionally throughout the ancient Mediterranean, in Anatolia “mountain-persons” are more common and can be shown to reflect local traditions dating back millennia. Hittite kings regularly swore oaths by mountains and often represented them in visual art as partly anthropomorphized supports of royal power. Long after the Bronze Age—in fact, at least until the Byzantine period—people in Anatolia continued to celebrate cases of ontological permeability (and amalgamation) involving mountains that were thought to be divine before the classical period. Relevant examples range over a vast chronological span and include the case of the Christian martyr Ariadne in Phrygia who became a mountain to flee her persecutors, a civic club in Roman Sardis who claimed direct descent from Tmolus (a mountain that happens to have been one of the earliest kings of Lydia), the famous Niobe, a woman who according to Greek myth was petrified for boasting about her fecundity in front of a virgin goddess, and a host of other Anatolian mountains that were believed in Greek and Roman antiquity to have been genetically or sexually associated with both men and gods. Using current anthropological theory (drawn primarily from scholars working in the Amazon) I offer a glimpse into the lasting vitality of Anatolian ontologies of landscape according to which mountains, men, and god were dynamically entangled.

Book Talk: Ananda Cohen-Aponte

The role of the visual arts in negotiating a sense of place and identity is an important one, and mural paintings reveal the complex ways that artists and viewers conceptualize the space they inhabit.

In a Chats in the Stacks talk, Ananda Cohen-Aponte will talk about her new book, Heaven, Hell, and Everything in Between (University of Texas Press, 2016), about the vivid, often apocalyptic church murals of Peru from the early colonial period through the nineteenth century.

By exploring the sociopolitical situation represented by the artists, she discovers that the murals are embedded in complex networks of trade, commerce, and the exchange of ideas between the Andes and Europe. She also sheds light on the unique ways that artists and viewers worked through difficult questions of representing sacredness. Unlike the murals of New Spain that used abstract motifs preferred by the Incas, the murals of the Andes command power and contemplation, visual archives of the complex negotiations among empire, communities, and individuals.

Ananda Cohen-Aponte is assistant professor in the Department of History of Art and Visual Studies at Cornell University. She was a Woodrow Wilson Career Enhancement Fellow for the 2015-2016 academic year.

This event is sponsored by Olin Library.

Buffalo Street Books will offer books for purchase and signing. Refreshments served.

Free and open to all.

CIAMS Workshop – Tobias Wild

On Monday, March 27, 2017 at noon in McGraw 125 (LOL), Tobias Wild, a visiting exchange student from Freiburg, will be discussing his work-in-progress “Visual representations of Hellenistic rulers in small scale statues” in open seminar format.

To acquire the draft of the paper that we will discuss, please email the CIAMS Assistant Director.

CIAMS brown bag colloquia are a great way for faculty and students to refine drafts of papers through discussion and peer review in an informal and friendly setting. The author will give a brief, approximately 15 minute overview of the paper, and then the floor will be open for discussion.  If you would like to submit a paper for a brown bag colloquium, please contact the CIAMS Assistant Director.

CIAMS Lecture Series – Arnau Garcia

 

Abstract:

This presentation will discuss a group of study cases carried on during the last years in the upper parts of different mountain ranges in the North-East of the Iberian Peninsula. The works discussed are part of integrated studies in which archaeological, historical and ethnographic data, together with palaeoenvironmental researches have been used to analyse the relationships between landscape systems and human land-use strategies on mountains from a long-term perspective. The archaeological research in those environments is characterized by the specific geographic conditions and the particularities of past human economic activities and settlement patterns.

An overview on the results shows that about 1000 anthropogenic structures have been detected and classified in upper-mountain areas in the study areas. More than a hundred of them have been excavated and near 150 C14 dates have been conducted. Together, they represent a large chronological framework, from Early Neolithic to Modern times. Most of the structures are related to pastoral activities (huts, enclosures), but other activities regarding forestry and mineral exploitation are also documented. In this sense, the research shows that pastoralism has played a decisive role in the human shaping of mountain Cultural Landscapes in the studied areas. Anthropogenic deforestation episodes related to the creation and maintenance of pastoral grasslands, have been documented from the Neolithic onwards. The studies give also some clues on how important historical processes of social change, such as that of Romanization or the formation of feudal societies, have had a deep impact in mountain landscapes. The setting up of specialized economic activities has been punctually documented for those periods, proving that these were intimately linked to the historical processes documented at lower altitudes.

 

RadioCIAMS – Fiona Kidd

On February 24, 2017, NYU Abu Dhabi archaeologist Fiona Kidd met a panel of CIAMS students (Dusti Bridges, Betty Hensellek, Jeanine Hoy, Laryssa Shipley, and Jay Weimar) and faculty (Lori Khatchadourian, host) to discuss wall paintings and elite iconograhphy at the site of Akchakhan-kala in modern-day Uzbekistan. The discussion of approximately 45 minutes opens below.

Congratulations CIAMS graduates of January 2017!

Congratulations to the CIAMS MA and PhD students who graduated in January 2017!

Four CIAMS MA students graduated: Jenna Bittenbender, Ned Fischer, Louisa Nash, and Emily Stanton. In addition, CIAMS-affiliated student, Beth Ryan, completed her PhD in the Anthropology department.

We at CIAMS are very proud of our recent graduates and wish them the best of luck in their future endeavors!