CIAMS Workshop – Tobias Wild

On Monday, March 27, 2017 at noon in McGraw 125 (LOL), Tobias Wild, a visiting exchange student from Freiburg, will be discussing his work-in-progress “Visual representations of Hellenistic rulers in small scale statues” in open seminar format.

To acquire the draft of the paper that we will discuss, please email the CIAMS Assistant Director.

CIAMS brown bag colloquia are a great way for faculty and students to refine drafts of papers through discussion and peer review in an informal and friendly setting. The author will give a brief, approximately 15 minute overview of the paper, and then the floor will be open for discussion.  If you would like to submit a paper for a brown bag colloquium, please contact the CIAMS Assistant Director.

CIAMS Lecture Series – Arnau Garcia

 

Abstract:

This presentation will discuss a group of study cases carried on during the last years in the upper parts of different mountain ranges in the North-East of the Iberian Peninsula. The works discussed are part of integrated studies in which archaeological, historical and ethnographic data, together with palaeoenvironmental researches have been used to analyse the relationships between landscape systems and human land-use strategies on mountains from a long-term perspective. The archaeological research in those environments is characterized by the specific geographic conditions and the particularities of past human economic activities and settlement patterns.

An overview on the results shows that about 1000 anthropogenic structures have been detected and classified in upper-mountain areas in the study areas. More than a hundred of them have been excavated and near 150 C14 dates have been conducted. Together, they represent a large chronological framework, from Early Neolithic to Modern times. Most of the structures are related to pastoral activities (huts, enclosures), but other activities regarding forestry and mineral exploitation are also documented. In this sense, the research shows that pastoralism has played a decisive role in the human shaping of mountain Cultural Landscapes in the studied areas. Anthropogenic deforestation episodes related to the creation and maintenance of pastoral grasslands, have been documented from the Neolithic onwards. The studies give also some clues on how important historical processes of social change, such as that of Romanization or the formation of feudal societies, have had a deep impact in mountain landscapes. The setting up of specialized economic activities has been punctually documented for those periods, proving that these were intimately linked to the historical processes documented at lower altitudes.

 

RadioCIAMS – Fiona Kidd

On February 24, 2017, NYU Abu Dhabi archaeologist Fiona Kidd met a panel of CIAMS students (Dusti Bridges, Betty Hensellek, Jeanine Hoy, Laryssa Shipley, and Jay Weimar) and faculty (Lori Khatchadourian, host) to discuss wall paintings and elite iconograhphy at the site of Akchakhan-kala in modern-day Uzbekistan. The discussion of approximately 45 minutes opens below.

Congratulations CIAMS graduates of January 2017!

Congratulations to the CIAMS MA and PhD students who graduated in January 2017!

Four CIAMS MA students graduated: Jenna Bittenbender, Ned Fischer, Louisa Nash, and Emily Stanton. In addition, CIAMS-affiliated student, Beth Ryan, completed her PhD in the Anthropology department.

We at CIAMS are very proud of our recent graduates and wish them the best of luck in their future endeavors!

Eurasian Archaeology Conference at Cornell

 

The Eurasian Archaeology Conference Committee at Cornell University announces their Fifth Conference on Eurasian Archaeology, scheduled for October 26-28, 2017.

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Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to announce that the Fifth Conference on Eurasian Archaeology will be held on the campus of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, from October 26-28, 2017.  Our theme will be: “Gods on the Grasslands, Myths in the Mountains”. Details will follow shortly, including an abstract, submission deadlines, and information on student travel support.  You can also find information about the Eurasian Archaeology Conferences, past and present, at http://eac.arts.cornell.edu/.

We are also proud to announce the publication of the volume derived from our last conference.  Fitful Histories and Unruly Publics: Rethinking Temporalty and Community in Eurasian Archaeology will be published this month by Brill: http://www.brill.com/products/book/fitful-histories-and-unruly-publics-rethinking-temporality-and-community-eurasian-archaeology.

Please circulate this email far and wide. We look forward to making this our most engaging Eurasian Archaeology Conference yet!

Very best regards,
The Eurasian Archaeology Conference Committee
Cornell University

RadioCIAMS – Steve Kosiba

On October 14, 2016 University of Minnesota archaeologist Steve Kosiba met a panel of CIAMS students (Kelli Breeden, Andrew Crocker, Perri Gerard-Little, Katie Jarriel, and Sam Sanft) and faculty (Adam Smith, host) to discuss materiality, constructions of value, and placemaking among the Inka.

In preparation for discussion, the participants read:

  • Bauer, A. and Kosiba, S. 2016. How things act: An archaeology of materials in political life. Journal of Social Archaeology 16(2): 115-141.
  • Kosiba, S. 2012. Emplacing value, cultivating order: places of conversion and practices of subordination throughout early Inka state formation (Cusco, Peru). In J.K. Papadopoulos and G. Urton, eds. The Construction of Value in the Ancient World. Los Angeles: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology. Pp. 97-127.

The discussion of about an hour starts below: