Eurasian Archaeology Conference at Cornell

 

The Eurasian Archaeology Conference Committee at Cornell University announces their Fifth Conference on Eurasian Archaeology, scheduled for October 26-28, 2017.

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Dear Colleagues,

We are delighted to announce that the Fifth Conference on Eurasian Archaeology will be held on the campus of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, from October 26-28, 2017.  Our theme will be: “Gods on the Grasslands, Myths in the Mountains”. Details will follow shortly, including an abstract, submission deadlines, and information on student travel support.  You can also find information about the Eurasian Archaeology Conferences, past and present, at http://eac.arts.cornell.edu/.

We are also proud to announce the publication of the volume derived from our last conference.  Fitful Histories and Unruly Publics: Rethinking Temporalty and Community in Eurasian Archaeology will be published this month by Brill: http://www.brill.com/products/book/fitful-histories-and-unruly-publics-rethinking-temporality-and-community-eurasian-archaeology.

Please circulate this email far and wide. We look forward to making this our most engaging Eurasian Archaeology Conference yet!

Very best regards,
The Eurasian Archaeology Conference Committee
Cornell University

RadioCIAMS – Steve Kosiba

On October 14, 2016 University of Minnesota archaeologist Steve Kosiba met a panel of CIAMS students (Kelli Breeden, Andrew Crocker, Perri Gerard-Little, Katie Jarriel, and Sam Sanft) and faculty (Adam Smith, host) to discuss materiality, constructions of value, and placemaking among the Inka.

In preparation for discussion, the participants read:

  • Bauer, A. and Kosiba, S. 2016. How things act: An archaeology of materials in political life. Journal of Social Archaeology 16(2): 115-141.
  • Kosiba, S. 2012. Emplacing value, cultivating order: places of conversion and practices of subordination throughout early Inka state formation (Cusco, Peru). In J.K. Papadopoulos and G. Urton, eds. The Construction of Value in the Ancient World. Los Angeles: Cotsen Institute of Archaeology. Pp. 97-127.

The discussion of about an hour starts below:

RadioCIAMS – Matthew Canepa

canepa-photoOn September 23, 2016 University of Minnesota archaeologist Matthew Canepa meta panel of CIAMS students (Gabby Borenstein, Andrew Crocker, Jeanine Hoy, Jake Nabel, Jessica Plant, Ellie Reppy, Andrew Smith, and Jay Weimar)  and faculty (Ben Anderson and Lori Khatchadourian, host) to discuss iconography, architecture, and the construction of royal identity in the Sassanian Empire.

The discussion of approximately one hour opens below.

CIAMS Lecture Series – Matthew Canepa

canepa-poster-smSpeaker bio:
Matthew P. Canepa (PhD, University of Chicago) is an historian of art, archaeology and religions. His research focuses on the intersection of art, ritual and power in the eastern Mediterranean, Persia and the wider Iranian world. Prof. Canepa’s forthcoming book entitled The Iranian Expanse (University of California Press) is a large-scale study of the transformation of Iranian cosmologies, landscapes and architecture from the height of the Achaemenids to the coming of Islam.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Archaeology Undergraduate Pizza Dinner

Archaeology LunchInterested in studying archaeology, ancient languages, or ancient cultures? Come to a free pizza dinner!

 

Join students and faculty from Archaeology, Anthropology, and Classics to eat, get acquainted, and learn more about opportunities, courses, and events at Cornell!

Monday, September 19
5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
G24 Goldwin Smith Hall

Contact:
Prof. Caitlin Barrett, Archaeology DUS (ceb329@cornell.edu)
Prof. Courtney Roby, Classics DUS (croby@cornell.edu)
Prof. Paul Nadasdy, Anthropology DUS (pn79@cornell.edu)

CIAMS faculty members receive DCAPS Digitization Grant

A small section of the plans to be digitized under the grant

A small section of the plans to be digitized under the grant

CIAMS faculty members Jeff Zorn (Near Eastern Studies) and Lauren Monroe (Near Eastern Studies) recently received funding from the Grants Program for Digital Collections in Arts and Sciences at Cornell University in order to digitize the architectural plans for the site of Tell en-Naṣbeh, located 12 km north of Jerusalem in the West Bank. Approximately two thirds of this three hectare, primarily Iron Age, site was excavated by a team from Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, CA, between 1926–1935 under the direction of W. F. Badé. Tell en-Naṣbeh is one of the most broadly excavated sites in the southern Levant, making it of great importance for those interested in studying house construction, settlement planning and social organization. The full set of plans has, until now, only been available to those able to travel to Berkeley. This digitization project will at last make these important plans available to students and scholars at Cornell and around the world.

CIAMS 2016 Welcome Back Reception

pizza and sushiCome and help CIAMS students and faculty kick off the start of a great academic year! You’ll meet our incoming students and catch up on everyone’s summer adventures. Fare includes the traditional pizza and sushi, as well as cheese, wine, and other libations. 

CIAMS Welcome Back Reception
Thursday, September 1, 2016
5:30 p.m. (please note time change)
History of Art lounge (Goldwin Smith G08).

Gabby Borenstein wins Dolores Zohrab Liebmann Fellowship

Gabby BorensteinCIAMS PhD student Gabby Borenstein recently received a Dolores Zohrab Liebmann Fellowship for her archaeological research in Armenia.  The Cornell Graduate School website featured Gabby in a Student Spotlight, which may be found here. During her interview, Gabby had the following to say about her experience as a part of the CIAMS community:

The Cornell Institute for Archaeology and Material Studies (CIAMS) is both an institute and a community. I feel truly lucky to be a part of a scholarly group that transcends classrooms and lecture halls. It is rare to be surrounded by peers who are also teachers, and advisors who are also colleagues and unparalleled support systems. The university promotes a rich, culturally informed approach to archaeology that I knew would train me to be both the type of academic and individual I aspired to become.

Congratulations to Gabby on her outstanding achievement!