Category Archives: news

RadioCIAMS – Fotini Kondyli

Image courtesy of Fotini Kondyli.

Image courtesy of Fotini Kondyli.

On April 22, 2016 Fotini Kondyli (University of Virginia) met a panel of CIAMS students (Sam Barber, Kathleen Garland, Jessica Plant, and Jess Ro. Pfundstein) and faculty (Ben Anderson) to discuss community in the rural landscapes of Byzantine Greece.

The full discussion of about 55 minutes opens below.

Congratulations to Eilis Monahan for her NSF grant!

Cornell Ph.D. student Eilis Monahan

Eilis Monahan, doctoral candidate (Cornell University, Near Eastern Studies)

Congratulations to Cornell doctoral candidate Eilis Monahan (Near Eastern Studies) for receiving an NSF Doctoral Dissertation Research Grant for her dissertation research on Cyprus! Her project abstract may be read below.

Enclosure and Exclusion: Fortifications and the Disciplinary Landscape in the Transition to the Late Bronze Age on Cyprus

The proposed archaeological research will investigate the construction of fortifications and shifting settlement patterns in Cyprus during the Middle Bronze Age to Late Bronze Age transition. These fortifications are the first monumental architecture on the island, but are only 
in use during a brief but critical period, during the transformation of Cyprus from a relatively egalitarian and insular village-based society, to an urban-focused complex society, engaged in trade and diplomatic relations with the major polities of the eastern Mediterranean. Funding will support systematic pedestrian survey of the Yalias River Valley, continued excavation at the fortresses of Barsak and Nikolidhes, and the analysis of material from previous surveys and excavations of the cluster of fortified sites and contemporaneous settlements in the Ayios Sozomenos region in central Cyprus housed in the Cyprus Museum, Nicosia and the Medelhavsmuseet, Stockholm. This research will investigate the form, function, and construction methods of the fortifications and the location and chronology of other sites in the region, in order to explicate how fortifications produce a disciplinary landscape that alters the experience and perception of space, and the impact these effects have on social relations and the construction of authority.

This project investigates how the material world, including the natural and built environment, does not merely set the conditions of social practice, but is an efficacious actor within
 the political domain. Significantly, this research will focus on how fortifications, by
 dividing, organizing, and surveilling space and social practice, create a disciplinary landscape through which authority is represented and social inequality is apprehended. In this manner, this investigation into the role of Cypriot fortresses in shaping the imagination and experience of political life will contribute to the wider discussion of militarization and how political regimes are established through place-making and structuring human experience of the landscape, ongoing processes in regions of conflict and development throughout the world. Additionally
 this study is the first to systematically investigate fortifications in the central region of Cyprus and 
to situate their study within the context of the landscape and contemporaneous settlement patterns, which will provide information critical to understanding the history of Cyprus’ settlement shifts and social transformations, and articulating these developments with broader regional trajectories in the Mediterranean and the Near East.

Congratulations to Lori Khatchadourian and Adam Smith on their NSF grant!

Lori Khatchadourian and Adam Smith in the field in Armenia.

Lori Khatchadourian and Adam Smith in the field in Armenia.

Congratulations to CIAMS professors Lori Khatchadourian (Near Eastern Studies) and Adam Smith (Anthropology) for winning an NSF grant for their field research in the South Caucasus! Their collaborators include Ian Lindsay (Purdue), Alan Greene (Stanford), and Maureen Marshal (Illinois). Their project abstract may be read below.

 


Collaborative Research: Fortifications and Long-Term Political Process in Bronze and Iron Age Southern Caucasia 

The proposed research investigates long-term shifts in fortress settlement systems, ancient warfare, and political transformation in the South Caucasus spanning ca.1500-200 BC, from
the initial construction of hilltop forts during the Late Bronze Age, to their elaboration under Urartian imperial dominion, to their repudiation in the Achaemenid Iron III period.
Funding from NSF will support two seasons of systematic survey, test excavations, bioarchaeological research, materials analysis, and environmental reconstruction in the upper Kasakh River valley of northwestern Armenia, which hosts sites from the full range of Bronze and Iron Age periods. This research will investigate how shifting patterns of fortress construction and use, residential mobility, and site destruction and abandonment were factors in shaping political association.  The research will examine ancient fortified landscapes and warfare as social and material conditions through which political processes unfold. Its significance rests on three primary issues. First, this study will energize existing discussions of warfare in archaeology and anthropology by juxtaposing material indications of conflict with long-term patterns of settlement, political association, goods circulation and consumption, ritual practice, and social identity. In so doing, it will recast fortresses as more than just practical instruments in a material apparatus of force, but as vital in shaping political subjects and authority, as projects of communal labor, and as historically contingent objects of contestation and commemoration. Second, the proposed study will contribute essential time depth to dialogues seeking to lend social and historical context to contemporary regional conflicts, their impacts on the politics and identities of social groups, and the ties to place and polity among mobile communities. As persistent ethnic clashes continue to impact contemporary life, understanding the impact of war in the past can help frame the causes and implications of modern conflicts while shaping responses to them. Finally, this study marks the first attempt in the Caucasus to articulate the long-term history of conflict, settlement shifts, and social transformation in the region with both the broader regional trajectories of the Near East and more localized natural and anthropogenic environmental changes.

Applying to the MA Program in Archaeology: A Brief Guide

Arkeo banner

CIAMS is currently accepting applications for the 2016-2017 academic year for our Masters Program in Archaeology.

The deadline for applications is: JANUARY 15, 2016

To apply for the Masters Program in Archaeology, submit your online application to the Cornell Graduate School Admissions Website. A description of the field of Archaeology may be found at the Graduate School, and more in-depth information about the requirements and expected course of study for the MA degree is located on the CIAMS website.

Questions about the MA Program in Archaeology should be sent to the CIAMS Director of Graduate Studies.

Students considering to applying to graduate school in the field of Archaeology are encouraged to read this informative blog post by Cornell professor Adam T. Smith.

Gods and Scholars: Studying Religion at a Secular University

Zapotec Funerary Urn, Mexico, 750-1200 CE.Gods and Scholars
Studying Religion at a Secular University

October 22, 2015 – March 7, 2016
Hirshland Exhibition Gallery
Carl A. Kroch Library

CIAMS M.A. student Fredrika Loew has curated a new exhibit entitled “Gods and Scholars: Studying Religion at a Secular University,” currently on display at Kroch Library.

 

CIAMS Event

On November 17, 2015, Fredrika will present an introductory lecture on the exhibit (4:30 p.m., Olin library 106) followed by an exhibition visit and reception (5:00-6:30 p.m., Hirshland Exhibition Gallery, Kroch library).

Exhibit Description

From its founding in 1865, Cornell University has been firmly nonsectarian, welcoming students and faculty of any religion, or no religion at all. This approach was controversial in the mid to late 19th century, when the majority of American universities were religiously affiliated; Cornell was called the “Godless” university by many. However, religion was in no way absent from campus life. On the contrary, with the rapid growth of its library collections, the new university began seeking out religious works of all types and eras. By the time the first incoming class arrived in 1868, instructors and students could interact with a vast array of sacred works. These materials supported courses on topics such as architecture, art history, philology, social reform and injustice, and literature. They were also used to complement sermons in the University chapel. This exhibition highlights the collecting of religious texts at Cornell and introduces many of the figures who have built the collection over the past 150 years.

This exhibition contains materials from the Rare and Manuscript Collections, as well as several artifacts from the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art.

The History Center Talks – Kurt Jordan

jordan tchc talkOn Saturday, September 19th, 2015 at 2:00 PM, The History Center in Tompkins County hosted Professor Kurt Jordan for his presentation “Destroyed, Forgotten, Never Noted: Ithaca’s Hidden Indigenous History.” Kurt A. Jordan is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and American Indian Studies at Cornell University. His research centers on the archaeology and history of Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) peoples, emphasizing the settlement patterns, housing, and economies of 17th and 18th century Senecas.

Kurt Jordan speaks at the History Center. Photo credit: Amanda Bosworth, The Cornell Chronicle.

Kurt Jordan speaks at the History Center. Photo credit: Amanda Bosworth, The Cornell Chronicle.

Many observers have noted that little is understood about the history of indigenous peoples in the Ithaca area. This presentation both describes why this is the case, and summarizes what is known. Starting with the earliest American settlers, past Ithacans took a cavalier attitude toward the indigenous archaeological record. Mingling curiosity with disrespect for indigenous heritage, Ithacans documented almost nothing as the archaeological record was destroyed. Despite this sordid history, quite a bit can be gleaned about how the Cayugas and their allies and ancestors dwelled on these lands.

Jordan has conducted archaeological fieldwork in collaboration with members of the Seneca Nation of Indians since 1999. His first book, The Seneca Restoration, 1715-1754: An Iroquois Local Political Economy, was published by the University Press of Florida in 2008.

Professor Jordan’s lecture was reported in the Cornell Chronicle on September 21, 2015.

The History Center in Tompkins County
401 E. State St. #100
Ithaca, NY 14850

The History Center Talks – Fred Gleach

artifactsJoin us at The History Center in Tompkins County on Thursday, September 17th, 2015 at 6:00 PM for the presentation “With Respect to Native American Artifacts” with Professor Fredric Wright Gleach.

Professor Gleach is a Senior Lecturer and the Curator of the Anthropology Collections at Cornell University. Best known for his work focused on the Powhatan Indians of Virginia, he has also done archaeological work in Illinois and Spain, and archival and ethnographic studies on Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans in the US. He grew up in Richmond, Virginia, completed graduate studies at the University of Chicago, and has lived in Ithaca for over 20 years.

“With Respect to Native American Artifacts” will feature a selection of artifacts from the collections of Cornell and The History Center. Prof. Gleach will lead the audience through an exploration of topics including:
— How one recognizes, identifies, and interprets artifacts
— How North American indigenous peoples work with natural materials
— How traditional practices continue into the present
— Where one might turn to learn more

Job Listing – Assistant Professor, Bioarchaeology

Position Title: Assistant Professor – Bioarchaeology
Position Type: Tenure-track faculty
Application Deadline: November 1, 2015

The Department of Anthropology at Cornell University invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position focused in bioarchaeology. We construe bioarchaeology broadly to include a range of approaches to understanding the human body in its material setting both historically and theoretically. The ideal candidate will help to strengthen links among departmental research interests in archaeology, biological anthropology, and medical anthropology. We seek candidates who ground their biological interests in archaeological field work and whose research involves a concern with archaeological context, innovative approaches to theoretical interpretation, and sensitivity to the ethics of practice. Although we have a particular interest in applications from candidates conducting research in Latin America (including the Caribbean) and Asia, geographic area of expertise is open.

For the full listing and to submit an application, please visit the posting on Academic Jobs Online.