Category Archives: news

Congratulations to Cornell’s 2015 Archaeology Graduates!

Image result for cornell commencement capThe CIAMS faculty and staff wish all the best to Cornell students being graduated with Archaeology Majors and Master’s degrees in Spring 2015
The Undergraduate Majors are Morgan Michel-Schottman, Alexander Morgan, Eliizabeth Napper, and Zachary Peterson.
And the Master’s in Archaeology are William Breitweiser, Cynthia Kocik, Nicholas Lashway, and Katherine Seufer.

Congratulations, and good luck to all of you!

New archaeology journal focused on publishing student research

From Gonzalo Linares, Oxford
The International Journal of Student Research in Archaeology-IJSRA (link to flyer) is an open-access, peer-reviewed journal, edited by a team of students from more than 30 top institutions in 13 countries. The aim of this publication is to be a global reference point in archaeology, as well as to serve as an international forum for the exchange of excellent scholarship in an atmosphere of constructive dialogue and inclusivity. Ultimately, we aim to enhance the academic experience, scholarly presence, and recognition of students worldwide. This Journal accepts papers addressing any topic and time period of archaeological interest. Research may be based in any geographical area, engage with any methodological and theoretical framework, and include integrative insights and evidence from any discipline.

This Journal aims to foster global participation and to attract the submission of the best student research in archaeology, regardless of academic institution, nationality, gender, ethnicity or religion, in order to enhance international cooperation and mutual understanding. Therefore, this Journal does not charge submission or publication fees. Assistance with academic English of those publishable articles written by non-native speakers will be provided.

The intellectual property of anything published in the Journal remains the respective authors’, who are free to reproduce it in whatever way, upon acknowledging this Journal as the first place of publication.The publication of previously unpublished data should be authorised by the relevant academic tutor/supervisor.

The deadline for submissions for the first issue is September 1st 2015. E-mail for submissions:editor.ijsra@gmail.com

Call for Papers available here: https://www.academia.edu/12218246/I_Call_for_Papers_-_International_Journal_of_Student_Research_in_Archaeology

More information is available in our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/ijsra

Kind regards,

Gonzalo Linares
Executive Editor of the International Journal of Student Research in Archaeology
BA Archaeology & Anthropology, University of Oxford (UK) https://oxford.academia.edu/GonzaloLinaresMatás

Strong reaction needed to avoid deep NSF funding cuts

Dear Colleagues,
As many of you will know via messages from various societies, next week Congress will debate a bill – America Competes Act of 2015 (H.R. 1806) – which if it were to become law will cut NSF social sciences funding – i.e. including archaeology – by 45%, i.e. destroy its support from its already rather pathetic level. This is back to the issue of the past 18 months and is again led by Lamar Smith (R, Texas).

Please voice your opposition by calling or writing your representative; you can also send a message to Congress here: http://www.cossa.org/advocacy/take-action/.
[You will know this worked when you receive a form-letter response from your Congressman]

Some information via the Consortium of Social Sciences (COSSA) is available at: http://www.cossa.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/House-COMPETES-Analysis-April-2015-2.pdf?utm_source=Need+for+Immediate+Action%3A+Potential+NSF+Cuts&utm_campaign=NSF+eBlast&utm_medium=email

As last time (late 2013-2014) we should all look to find ways to oppose and to ARGUE why this is bad thing – versus just be against or say ‘bad Republicans’. In particular we should advocate ‘why Archaeology’ as our part of this campaign.

Please write to your Representative.
Last year this worked for our local Republican. Doing nothing will only assist in the destruction of what little federal support there is for archaeology – so please react.

Thanks,
Sturt Manning

CIAMS Awards Over $30,000 in Student Funding for Research and Travel

bresto headerWith the generous support of the Hirsch family, this Spring CIAMS awarded over $15,000 for archaeology-related travel to Cornell undergraduates and graduates, and over $15,000 to graduate students for archaeological research projects.  These funds will help Cornell archaeology students work around the globe, in New York, Belize, Italy, Georgia, Israel, Tunisia, and Cyprus. Congratulations and good luck to all awardees.

Archaeology Pizza lunch and fieldwork discussion

pizza lunch fieldwork Apr 2015Join archaeology students and faculty to eat free pizza from Ned’s and learn about finding and doing fieldwork. Open to all interested students and faculty who want to share or learn about archaeolocial field experiences. 
Friday April 24, 2015 at 1:00–2:00 pm in the Landscapes and Objects Lab, 125 McGraw Hall. Hosted by CIAMS and the Undergraduate Program in Archaeology.

CIAMS Students Reaching Out in Local Schools

Etter teachingKudos to CIAMS students Bonnie Etter and Jennifer Carrington for their volunteer work at local middle schools. Both have been working through the organization GRASSHOPR to teach archaeology courses. Bonnie used education boxes borrowed from the Johnson Museum to engage not only students but multiple teachers, the principal, even the dean! The teachers were so excited that they have asked her to do versions of it for their own classes. Kudos!

NES-CIAMS Brownbag: Reacting to Heritage Destruction in Iraq

The Near Eastern Studies department and CIAMS are planning a brown bag lunch to talk about ISIS, Islam, and the recent abominable acts of heritage destruction in northern Iraq.   As developments of critical concern to both the NES and CIAMS communities make the daily headlines, it would seem an important time to gather and discuss these current affairs, and grapple with the difficult question of how archaeologists, museums, and the wider heritage community can best respond.   Professor David Powers, an expert on Islamic law, has kindly agreed to join us for this conversation to help us think through the intersection of Islam, iconoclasm, and the Islamic State.  CIAMS faculty, affiliates and students are invited to join us Thursday March 12 at 12:15 in the Landscapes and Objects Lab, 125 McGraw Hall.

Best,
Lori Khatchadourian