Category Archives: CIAMS Lectures

CIAMS Lecture Series – Sonya Atalay

Atalay poster

A commitment to decolonization requires fundamental shifts in the way we make, teach, and share new knowledge. Transforming research from an extractive, often exploitative endeavor toward a practice that contributes to healing and community-well being is one of the key challenges of our time for those in the academy today.  Drawing on five recent archaeology and heritage-related projects carried out in partnership with Native American and Turkish communities, I share the exciting possibilities of community-based research practices along with the complexities, contradictions, and impediments involved in doing engaged and activist scholarship. From complex ethical dilemmas and our need for revised IRB processes, to enhancing our skill sets in collaborative, participatory planning and knowledge mobilization strategies – I’ll discuss both the promise and perils involved in transforming research through a community-based approach.


CIAMS Lecture Series – John Cherry

Cherry poster

On Thursday, October 15, Dr. John Cherry (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World) will present “Archaeology Under the Volcano: Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat, 2010-2015.” The lecture will take place at 4:30 p.m. in Goldwin Smith Hall, G22. A reception will follow the talk.

CIAMS Lecture Series: Bill Angelbeck

On Thursday, September 17, Dr. Bill Angelbeck (Douglas College) will speak on “Applying Modes of Production Analysis to Non-State, or Anarchic, Societies” based on his research in the American Northwest.

Angelbeck poster (small)


The concept of modes of production has been a constructive form of analysis for chiefdom and state societies archaeologically. Here, I consider the analysis of modes of production among complex hunter-gatherers such as the Coast Salish. As first applied by Marx (and later by Eric Wolf), the analysis involved a large-scale approach to historical epochs concerning economy, tying together the means of production (tools) to the relations of production (sociopolitical organization). Yet, conceived at an epochal scale, the utility for archaeologists working within the Northwest Coast is rather generalized (e.g., “kinship mode of production”), without much explanatory power. Here, I offer that the analysis of modes of production can be effective if we apply it not broadly to characterize entire epochs but towards economies at the microscale, assessing seasonal rounds. In the Coast Salish past, this reveals socioeconomic modes of production that are multifaceted annually and over time.













CIAMS: Sergey Makhortykh on the Scythians of the North Black Sea

sergey 1Cornell Fulbright Scholar (Anthropology) Sergey Makhortykh, “The Scythians of the North Black Sea Region,” Wed April 29, 2015 at 4:30 pm in G22 Goldwin Smith Hall. The nomadic Scythians of Ukraine are the subject of ever increasing scientific and public interest. This presentation explores their history and culture as well as their contacts with the outside world. Reception with food and drink in the Art History Lounge to follow.

CIAMS Lecture: Ben Arbuckle on Neolithic Animal Economies

sheep for arbuckleBenjamin Arbuckle (Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill), “Exploring the origins, spread, and diversity of Neolithic animal economies in SW Asia.” Monday March 16, 2015 at 5 pm in G22 Goldwin Smith Hall. Arbuckle’s research addresses topics ranging from the origins and spread of domestic livestock in the Neolithic to the social and economic uses of animals in early complex societies. He directs the ‘Central Anatolian Pastoralism Project,’ and has worked at Çadır Höyük, Acemhöyük, Köşk Höyük, and Direkli Mağarası (all in Turkey).



Liz Robinson, “From Independent Town to Roman Municipium: the integration of Larinum into the Roman State”

Robinson_ImageElizabeth Robinson (Binghamton University)  gives a CIAMS lecture, “From Independent Town to Roman Municipium: the integration of Larinum into the Roman State,” Monday Feb 9 at 5 pm  in Goldwin Smith Hall G22. She is  also the guest speaker for a RadioCIAMS podcast recorded Feb 10. guest Dr. Robinson works primarily on the cultural and physical landscapes of Italy in the first millennium BCE and the nature of Roman interactions with the other inhabitants of the Italian peninsula in this period. She has excavated at Paestum, surveyed in the Upper Simeto Valley, and spent several seasons with the Gabii Project. Recently she has directed a resurvey of sites surrounding Larinum.  See abstract below. Continue reading