Category Archives: ANTH Colloquium

Anthro Colloquium: Nadia Abu El-Haj

The Cornell Department of Anthropology presents

Nadia Abu El-Haj
Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

“Combat through the Psychiatric Gaze: Conceptualizing Violence, Suffering, and Responsibility in the post-9/11 Era” 

Friday, March 4, 2016
3:30pm
to 5:00pm
McGraw Hall, 165 740-750 University Ave, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA

Prof. Abu El-Haj’s Biography:
My work straddles the disciplines of anthropology and history of science.  Concerned most generally with the relationships among scientific practices, social imaginaries and political regimes, I have examined the work of specific historical sciences within the context of their own historical and disciplinary conditions of possibility.  In turn, I have sought to understand how the epistemological commitments and empirical facts (and “things”) presupposed and generated by those disciplines have shaped the historical and political “common-sense” of a settler-nation, the racial imaginary of a national-/diasporic politics, and particular understandings and practices of the self. While my two books to date have focused on historical sciences (Israeli archaeology, and genetic history), I am now working on the field of military psychiatry, exploring the complex ethical and political implications of shifting psychiatric and public understandings of the trauma of soldiers.   Provisionally titled, The Ethics of Trauma: Moral Injury, Combat, and U.S. Empire, this book examines the myriad forms and legacies of violence that the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have unleashed, and how it is that so many of their attendant horrors remain hidden in plain sight.

This event is free and open to the public.  A recepton will follow the talk.

Anthro Colloquium: Barbara Mills (University of Arizona)

Photo credit: Matthew Devitt (ASU)

Photo credit: Matthew Devitt (ASU)

The Cornell Departments of Anthropology and CIAMS present

Barbara Mills
University of Arizona
 
Migration, Skill, and the Transformation of Social Networks in the Prehispanic Southwest
Friday, February 19
3:30 p.m.
McGraw Hall 165

 
This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow the talk.

Dr. Mills’s Bibliography:

I am an anthropological archaeologist with broad interests in archaeological method and theory, especially (but not exclusively) as applied to the North American Southwest.  My work has focused on ceramic analysis as a tool for understanding production, distribution, and consumption but more broadly is my interest in material culture to understand social relations in the past. My research on ceramic technology, craft specialization, and accumulations research led to a series of papers and edited volumes on social inequality, identity, feasting, and migration.  These interests were fostered by more than a decade of work in the Silver Creek area of east-central Arizona, including a multi-year collaborative project with the White Mountain Apache Tribe.  I also have field and research experience in a number of other areas of the Southwest including Zuni, Chaco, Mimbres, Grasshopper, and most recently the Greater Hohokam area.  Outside the U.S. I have research experience in Guatemala (Postclassic Maya), Kazakhstan (Bronze Age), and Turkey (Neolithic).  Besides ceramics I am interested in depositional practice, and how that can be used to understand memory, materiality, and relational logics.  Currently I am a PI on the Southwest Social Networks Project, which brings together data and a talented group of scholars to apply social network analysis (SNA) to archaeological data from a large area of the western Southwest. This ongoing project continues my interest in looking at the dynamics of social relations from a multiscalar perspective.

ANTH Colloqium: Shannon Dawdy on urban landscape

Dawdy poster clip“Archaeology as Profane Illumination: Dialectics of the Urban Landscape,”  Friday March 14, 3:30 in McGraw 215. Dawdy will also be featured in a RadioCIAMS podcast concerning ‘Millennial archaeology’.

Abstract: My effort here is to experiment with the methodology Walter Benjamin called Profane Illumination, or what one of his major interpreters, Susan Buck-Morss (1989), calls Dialectical Seeing.   Continue reading