Category Archives: lectures

CIAMS Lecture Series – Matthew Canepa

canepa-poster-smSpeaker bio:
Matthew P. Canepa (PhD, University of Chicago) is an historian of art, archaeology and religions. His research focuses on the intersection of art, ritual and power in the eastern Mediterranean, Persia and the wider Iranian world. Prof. Canepa’s forthcoming book entitled The Iranian Expanse (University of California Press) is a large-scale study of the transformation of Iranian cosmologies, landscapes and architecture from the height of the Achaemenids to the coming of Islam.







Anthro Colloquium: Nadia Abu El-Haj

The Cornell Department of Anthropology presents

Nadia Abu El-Haj
Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

“Combat through the Psychiatric Gaze: Conceptualizing Violence, Suffering, and Responsibility in the post-9/11 Era” 

Friday, March 4, 2016
to 5:00pm
McGraw Hall, 165 740-750 University Ave, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA

Prof. Abu El-Haj’s Biography:
My work straddles the disciplines of anthropology and history of science.  Concerned most generally with the relationships among scientific practices, social imaginaries and political regimes, I have examined the work of specific historical sciences within the context of their own historical and disciplinary conditions of possibility.  In turn, I have sought to understand how the epistemological commitments and empirical facts (and “things”) presupposed and generated by those disciplines have shaped the historical and political “common-sense” of a settler-nation, the racial imaginary of a national-/diasporic politics, and particular understandings and practices of the self. While my two books to date have focused on historical sciences (Israeli archaeology, and genetic history), I am now working on the field of military psychiatry, exploring the complex ethical and political implications of shifting psychiatric and public understandings of the trauma of soldiers.   Provisionally titled, The Ethics of Trauma: Moral Injury, Combat, and U.S. Empire, this book examines the myriad forms and legacies of violence that the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have unleashed, and how it is that so many of their attendant horrors remain hidden in plain sight.

This event is free and open to the public.  A recepton will follow the talk.

Anthro Colloquium: Barbara Mills (University of Arizona)

Photo credit: Matthew Devitt (ASU)

Photo credit: Matthew Devitt (ASU)

The Cornell Departments of Anthropology and CIAMS present

Barbara Mills
University of Arizona
Migration, Skill, and the Transformation of Social Networks in the Prehispanic Southwest
Friday, February 19
3:30 p.m.
McGraw Hall 165

This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow the talk.

Dr. Mills’s Bibliography:

I am an anthropological archaeologist with broad interests in archaeological method and theory, especially (but not exclusively) as applied to the North American Southwest.  My work has focused on ceramic analysis as a tool for understanding production, distribution, and consumption but more broadly is my interest in material culture to understand social relations in the past. My research on ceramic technology, craft specialization, and accumulations research led to a series of papers and edited volumes on social inequality, identity, feasting, and migration.  These interests were fostered by more than a decade of work in the Silver Creek area of east-central Arizona, including a multi-year collaborative project with the White Mountain Apache Tribe.  I also have field and research experience in a number of other areas of the Southwest including Zuni, Chaco, Mimbres, Grasshopper, and most recently the Greater Hohokam area.  Outside the U.S. I have research experience in Guatemala (Postclassic Maya), Kazakhstan (Bronze Age), and Turkey (Neolithic).  Besides ceramics I am interested in depositional practice, and how that can be used to understand memory, materiality, and relational logics.  Currently I am a PI on the Southwest Social Networks Project, which brings together data and a talented group of scholars to apply social network analysis (SNA) to archaeological data from a large area of the western Southwest. This ongoing project continues my interest in looking at the dynamics of social relations from a multiscalar perspective.

CIAMS Workshop – Uthara Suvrathan

The CIAMS Workshop series resumes on Friday, November 13, 2015, where Uthara Suvrathan (Hirsch Postdoctoral Associate) will be discussing a chapter of her monograph in progress, Persistent Peripheries: Archaeological and historical landscapes of an ancient city in South India, 3rd c. BCE – 18th c. CE.

The workshop will take place from 12-1 p.m. in the LOL (McGraw 125). Attendees are invited to bring their own lunch.

To obtain a copy of the chapter draft for review, please contact Katie Jarriel (

CIAMS Lecture Series – Sonya Atalay

Atalay poster

A commitment to decolonization requires fundamental shifts in the way we make, teach, and share new knowledge. Transforming research from an extractive, often exploitative endeavor toward a practice that contributes to healing and community-well being is one of the key challenges of our time for those in the academy today.  Drawing on five recent archaeology and heritage-related projects carried out in partnership with Native American and Turkish communities, I share the exciting possibilities of community-based research practices along with the complexities, contradictions, and impediments involved in doing engaged and activist scholarship. From complex ethical dilemmas and our need for revised IRB processes, to enhancing our skill sets in collaborative, participatory planning and knowledge mobilization strategies – I’ll discuss both the promise and perils involved in transforming research through a community-based approach.


CIAMS Lecture Series – John Cherry

Cherry poster

On Thursday, October 15, Dr. John Cherry (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World) will present “Archaeology Under the Volcano: Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat, 2010-2015.” The lecture will take place at 4:30 p.m. in Goldwin Smith Hall, G22. A reception will follow the talk.

NYSAA Talk – Cynthia Kocik

On October 1, 2015, Cynthia Kocik (Cornell University Dendrochronology Laboratory and CIAMS alumna) will present “Beams and Boards: Dating Historic Structures in New York State through Dendrochronology” at the monthly NYSAA meeting.

The meeting will take place at 6:30 p.m. at the Center for Natural Sciences (Ithaca College), room 208.

Driving directions:

From the main entrance of Ithaca College on Route 96B, proceed 3/4 around Alumni Circle and turn onto Grant Egbert Blvd.  Drive straight until you see a sign for Textor Circle.  Turn right on Textor Circle, then turn left twice into Blue Lot O.  Walk up the outdoor stairs alongside the Park School.  CNS is a large red brick building on your right.  Walk under the covered walkway to the entrance on your right.  Go through the double glass doors and up the stairs immediately to your left to 208.