Category Archives: lectures

CIAMS Lecture Series – John Cherry

Cherry poster

On Thursday, October 15, Dr. John Cherry (Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World) will present “Archaeology Under the Volcano: Survey and Landscape Archaeology on Montserrat, 2010-2015.” The lecture will take place at 4:30 p.m. in Goldwin Smith Hall, G22. A reception will follow the talk.

NYSAA Talk – Cynthia Kocik

On October 1, 2015, Cynthia Kocik (Cornell University Dendrochronology Laboratory and CIAMS alumna) will present “Beams and Boards: Dating Historic Structures in New York State through Dendrochronology” at the monthly NYSAA meeting.

The meeting will take place at 6:30 p.m. at the Center for Natural Sciences (Ithaca College), room 208.

Driving directions:

From the main entrance of Ithaca College on Route 96B, proceed 3/4 around Alumni Circle and turn onto Grant Egbert Blvd.  Drive straight until you see a sign for Textor Circle.  Turn right on Textor Circle, then turn left twice into Blue Lot O.  Walk up the outdoor stairs alongside the Park School.  CNS is a large red brick building on your right.  Walk under the covered walkway to the entrance on your right.  Go through the double glass doors and up the stairs immediately to your left to 208.

The History Center Talks – Kurt Jordan

jordan tchc talkOn Saturday, September 19th, 2015 at 2:00 PM, The History Center in Tompkins County hosted Professor Kurt Jordan for his presentation “Destroyed, Forgotten, Never Noted: Ithaca’s Hidden Indigenous History.” Kurt A. Jordan is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and American Indian Studies at Cornell University. His research centers on the archaeology and history of Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) peoples, emphasizing the settlement patterns, housing, and economies of 17th and 18th century Senecas.

Kurt Jordan speaks at the History Center. Photo credit: Amanda Bosworth, The Cornell Chronicle.

Kurt Jordan speaks at the History Center. Photo credit: Amanda Bosworth, The Cornell Chronicle.

Many observers have noted that little is understood about the history of indigenous peoples in the Ithaca area. This presentation both describes why this is the case, and summarizes what is known. Starting with the earliest American settlers, past Ithacans took a cavalier attitude toward the indigenous archaeological record. Mingling curiosity with disrespect for indigenous heritage, Ithacans documented almost nothing as the archaeological record was destroyed. Despite this sordid history, quite a bit can be gleaned about how the Cayugas and their allies and ancestors dwelled on these lands.

Jordan has conducted archaeological fieldwork in collaboration with members of the Seneca Nation of Indians since 1999. His first book, The Seneca Restoration, 1715-1754: An Iroquois Local Political Economy, was published by the University Press of Florida in 2008.

Professor Jordan’s lecture was reported in the Cornell Chronicle on September 21, 2015.

The History Center in Tompkins County
401 E. State St. #100
Ithaca, NY 14850

The History Center Talks – Fred Gleach

artifactsJoin us at The History Center in Tompkins County on Thursday, September 17th, 2015 at 6:00 PM for the presentation “With Respect to Native American Artifacts” with Professor Fredric Wright Gleach.

Professor Gleach is a Senior Lecturer and the Curator of the Anthropology Collections at Cornell University. Best known for his work focused on the Powhatan Indians of Virginia, he has also done archaeological work in Illinois and Spain, and archival and ethnographic studies on Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans in the US. He grew up in Richmond, Virginia, completed graduate studies at the University of Chicago, and has lived in Ithaca for over 20 years.

“With Respect to Native American Artifacts” will feature a selection of artifacts from the collections of Cornell and The History Center. Prof. Gleach will lead the audience through an exploration of topics including:
— How one recognizes, identifies, and interprets artifacts
— How North American indigenous peoples work with natural materials
— How traditional practices continue into the present
— Where one might turn to learn more

CIAMS Lecture Series: Bill Angelbeck

On Thursday, September 17, Dr. Bill Angelbeck (Douglas College) will speak on “Applying Modes of Production Analysis to Non-State, or Anarchic, Societies” based on his research in the American Northwest.

Angelbeck poster (small)


The concept of modes of production has been a constructive form of analysis for chiefdom and state societies archaeologically. Here, I consider the analysis of modes of production among complex hunter-gatherers such as the Coast Salish. As first applied by Marx (and later by Eric Wolf), the analysis involved a large-scale approach to historical epochs concerning economy, tying together the means of production (tools) to the relations of production (sociopolitical organization). Yet, conceived at an epochal scale, the utility for archaeologists working within the Northwest Coast is rather generalized (e.g., “kinship mode of production”), without much explanatory power. Here, I offer that the analysis of modes of production can be effective if we apply it not broadly to characterize entire epochs but towards economies at the microscale, assessing seasonal rounds. In the Coast Salish past, this reveals socioeconomic modes of production that are multifaceted annually and over time.













Paula Turkon, Mexican Dendrochronology

Turkon dendro MexicoNYSAA: Paula Turkon (Ithaca College), “Dendrochronology in Mesoamerican Archaeology: Preliminary Findings from Northwestern Mexico.” Thursday, May 7th, 2015, at 6:30 pm in room 208 of the Center for Natural Sciences at Ithaca College. The research is a cooperative effort involving Paula Turkon (Ithaca College), Sturt Manning (Cornell University), and Carol Griggs (Cornell University). Continue reading

Classics: Rubina Raja, Urban Archaeology in Jordan

Raja Classics Amman_BW_2Classics:  Rubina Raja  (Professor,  Classical Archaeology and Art, Institute for Culture and Society, Aarhus University, Denmark), “Changing the Urban Picture Through High Definition Archaeology: Urban Development in Jerash (Jordan) from the Roman to the Mamluk Period,” Friday, April 17, 2015 4:30 PM, 122 Goldwin Smith Hall, with reception to follow in 119 GSH.

CIAMS: Sergey Makhortykh on the Scythians of the North Black Sea

sergey 1Cornell Fulbright Scholar (Anthropology) Sergey Makhortykh, “The Scythians of the North Black Sea Region,” Wed April 29, 2015 at 4:30 pm in G22 Goldwin Smith Hall. The nomadic Scythians of Ukraine are the subject of ever increasing scientific and public interest. This presentation explores their history and culture as well as their contacts with the outside world. Reception with food and drink in the Art History Lounge to follow.