Category Archives: lectures

NYSAA: Jeff Zorn, Storage Pits and the State in Iron Age Israel

Displaying Standing on Hole-y Ground.jpgNew York State Archaeological Association (NYSAA) presents Jeff Zorn (Cornell University):  “Standing on Hole-y Ground: Storage Pits at Tell en-Naṣbeh and the Role of the State.” 
Tell en-Naṣbeh, probably biblical Mizpah of Benjamin, was excavated by W. F. Badè of Pacific School of Religion in five seasons between 1926 and 1935. About two-thirds of the 3.2 hectare/8 acre site was uncovered, providing an almost unparalleled example of settlement planning at a mid-size, fortified, rural Israelite town of the Iron Age. A unique and enigmatic feature of the site is a band of ca. 60 storage pits located around the southern periphery of the site, just inside the town’s massive fortifications. This talk explores whether these pits represent private or public storage (initiated by the Judean monarchy) and suggests that the evidence supports the latter theory.
Thursday, March 5 at 6:30 pm, 208 Center for Natural Sciences Bldg. Ithaca College. 

Angela Campbell (Metropolitan Museum), Conserving Works on Paper

Art | Science Intersections lecture 
Conserving Works on Paper
Thursday February 26, 5:15 p.m. Johnson Museum of Art 

Angela Campbell, assistant paper conservator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, will discuss pursuing a career as a conservator of works of art on paper.  

This free public lecture is supported in part by a grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and held in conjunction with the exhibition An Eye for Detail: Dutch Painting from the Leiden Collection and the seminar “Art | Science Intersections,” a collaboration between the Johnson Museum, the Department of the History of Art and Visual Studies, the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS). Additional support was provided through the generosity of Helen-Mae and Seymour R. Askin, Jr. ’47, and of Joseph W. Simon ’80 and Ernest F. Steiner ’63 in honor of Vera C. Simon ’55.

The entire Museum is open Thursdays until 8:00 p.m. now through April 30. Parking for this event is FREE at the metered spots in front of the Museum, and visitors can park at ANY Cornell parking garage. The closest is at Martha Van Rensselaer Hall off Forest Home Drive, about a five-minute walk east of the Museum.

NYSAA: J. Muller, child pathology in 19th c. poorhouse cemetery

Jennifer L Muller (Department of Anthropology, Ithaca College) gives a New York State Archaeological Association (NYSAA) lecture, “Nineteenth century perceptions of morality and disability: impacts on mortuary context and pathology among the children of the Erie County Poorhouse cemetery (1851-1913),” Thurs Feb 5, 6:30 at CNS 208, Ithaca College.  Continue reading

Liz Robinson, “From Independent Town to Roman Municipium: the integration of Larinum into the Roman State”

Robinson_ImageElizabeth Robinson (Binghamton University)  gives a CIAMS lecture, “From Independent Town to Roman Municipium: the integration of Larinum into the Roman State,” Monday Feb 9 at 5 pm  in Goldwin Smith Hall G22. She is  also the guest speaker for a RadioCIAMS podcast recorded Feb 10. guest Dr. Robinson works primarily on the cultural and physical landscapes of Italy in the first millennium BCE and the nature of Roman interactions with the other inhabitants of the Italian peninsula in this period. She has excavated at Paestum, surveyed in the Upper Simeto Valley, and spent several seasons with the Gabii Project. Recently she has directed a resurvey of sites surrounding Larinum.  See abstract below. Continue reading

Cynthia Kocik (Cornell Dendrochronology), “The Edges of Wood…”

Kockik CouncilHouse_JemisonCabin_LetchworthCIAMS Workshop: 2014 CIAMS MA graduate Cynthia Kocik discusses her work-in-progress, “The Edges of Wood: Dendrochronological Analysis of Three Seneca Iroquois Log Structures at Letchworth State Park, New York,” in open seminar format. Draft will be available from cmonroe@cornell.edu a week prior, so you may come with questions, and brown bag lunch if desired. Thurs Feb 5, 12:10 pm in Landscapes and Objects Lab (LOL, 125 McGraw Hall).

Roald Hoffmann, Protochemistries are a bridge

NYSAA LectureNobel prize-winner Roald Hoffmann (Dept. Chemistry, Cornell)speaks on the topic “Protochemistries are a Bridge.” Thursday, December 4, at 6:30 pm in Room 208 of Ithaca College’s Center for Natural Sciences. The talk is free and open to the public, so please bring friends and pass the word along to anyone you think might be interested! 

People did chemistry, darn good chemistry too, before there were ever chemists. For transformations of matter are inherent in the human condition. In winning metals from their ores, using them in weapons and decorative objects, in preparing and preserving food, in cosmetics, medicines, ceramics, in tanning leather, in dyes, in cleansing and mummification, craftsmen and women in every culture came up with some superb experimental chemistry. Stories of protochemistry, some of which I will relate, to this day form a natural bridge between chemists and nonchemists , between chemistry and culture. 

Susan Allen, Classical Spies: American Archaeologists in WWII Greece

Susan AllenBrown University Visiting Scholar Susan H. Allen discusses her recent book, Classical Spies, Thurs Nov 13, 4:30 in Goldwin Smith 122.
Allen’s book is the first insiders’ account of the operations of the American intelligence service in World War II Greece. Initiated by archaeologists in Greece and the eastern Mediterranean, the network drew on scholars’ personal contacts and knowledge of languages and terrain. While modern readers might think Indiana Jones is just a fantasy character, Classical Spies discloses events where even Indy would feel at home: burying Athenian dig records in an Egyptian tomb, activating prep-school connections to establish spies code-named Vulture and Chickadee, and organizing parachute drops. 
The lecture is co-sponsored by the Cornell Institute for European Studies (CIES), the Classics Department, Near Eastern Studies, and Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies (CIAMS).

 

CIAMS Workshop: Ben Anderson (Art History), ”’An alternative discourse': local interpreters of antiquities in the Ottoman Empire”

Ortakoy EskishehirCornell Art History Assistant Professor Ben Anderson discusses his work in progress, “‘An alternative discourse': local interpreters of antiquities in the Ottoman Empire,” in open forum/workshop. Bringing own lunch encouraged. Fri Nov 14 , 2014 at 12:00,  Landscapes and Objects Lab (LOL, 125 McGraw). Reading distributed to CIAMS members via email; send request to cmonroe@cornell.edu. Part of the CIAMS Workshop series.

A. Cohen Suarez, “Beyond the Frame: Murals of the Colonial Andes in Context.”

Dear Members and Friends of the Finger Lakes NYSAA Chapter,

 Our next NYSAA meeting and lecture will be Thursday, November 6, at 6:30 pm in Room 208 of Ithaca College’s Center for Natural Sciences.  Our speaker will be Ananda Cohen Suarez (History of Art, Cornell), who will present “Beyond the Frame: Murals of the Colonial Andes in Context.”

Description:

Mural painting served as one of the earliest forms of religious artistic expression during the period of Spanish colonial rule (1532-1824). Religious murals served as important tools in the evangelization of non-literate Andean peoples; didactic depictions of key doctrinal images facilitated the transmission of Christianity without recourse to the written word. This presentation draws on seven years of field and archival research and will focus on a series of case studies of 17th and 18th-century murals located in rural parish churches in the Cuzco region of Peru. In much of the current scholarly literature on painting in colonial Peru, murals are often treated as synonymous with paintings on canvas. Print publications further exploit this artificial conflation through the strategic cropping of photographs of murals within their respective spatial environments into neat squares and rectangles that assign them artificial borders and frames. This presentation re-situates colonial murals within their respective geographic, historical, and cultural contexts to understand their role as both persuasive expressions of the Catholic faith and as visual archives poised to communicate local beliefs and concepts.

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Upcoming NYSAA talks:

December 4, 2014: Roald Hoffmann (Chemistry, Cornell): Protochemistries are a bridge

February 5, 2015: Jennifer Muller (Dept. Anthropology, Ithaca College): title TBA (Bioarchaeology of the poor and disenfranchised)

Other local talks of archaeological interest can be found on the CIAMS website: http://ciams.cornell.edu/

A always, please let me know if you no longer wish to receive notices from the FLC NYSAA, or if you need a ride to next Thursday’s talk.

 Laura 

Laura W. Johnson-Kelly
President, Finger Lakes Chapter of the NY State Archaeological Association
and
Collection Manager and Head Conservator/Photographer
The Jonathan and Jeannette Rosen
Cuneiform Tablet Conservation Laboratory
Cornell University
726 University Avenue, Rm 103
Ithaca, NY 14850-3995