Category Archives: kudos

Eilis Monahan wins first annual ‘CAPPy’ by a paw

PotteryCat3
Near Eastern Studies doctoral student Eilis Monahan received the most votes for her entry featuring a tagged cat sleeping on an artifact processing table in Cyprus. As first recipient of the CIAMS Archaeological Photography Prize, Eilis wins $100 for purchasing books of her choice.
When contacted about her win,  Monahan gave the following background: 

“Pottery Cat, AKA Michael or Μιχάλης, was a stray in the village of Pera-Orinis, where the Politiko-Troullia project lives and where we have our lab space. I think it was the second day this summer [and] this adorable little orange cat followed me meowing the whole way. After that he just set up shop… he’d meet us every morning, and guard the school house at night. After about a week of students sneaking him food off their plates, we went out and bought him some cat food. We’d feed him in the plateia, but immediately after his meal, he’d be right back in the lab, sleeping on boxes, windowsills, artifacts or laps. He particularly liked sleeping on my lap every morning while I cataloged pottery. The project as a whole came to a consensus that there was no way he could stay in Cyprus [...]. Nearly everyone on the project chipped in, and we got him everything he needed for a trip to the U.S. Which would have gone without a hitch, but [...] Michael lost his seat, and his hard-sided carrier was too large to fit under a seat …, so he ended up wedged into the space between my seat and the seat in front of me, and I spent the whole trip with my knees up to my chin! But he’s now happily ensconced in my downstairs, so he doesn’t torture Ma’at my other cat, who is very sweet, but a total coward.”

Congratulations to Eilis, and to Pottery Cat! Thanks to all those who took the time to vote or submit images, some of which will be featured on the cycling website banner. 

 

Sherene Baugher, Archaeology of Cemeteries and Gravemarkers

Baugher bookKudos to Cornell Professor of Archaeology Sherene Baugher, on the publication of her co-authored book (with Richard Veit), The Archaeology of Cemeteries and Gravemarkers .

“A masterful overview of archaeological work on American gravestones and cemeteries that should be on the shelf of every student and scholar of mortuary studies.”–Lynn Rainville, author of Hidden History: African-American Cemeteries in Virginia

“A landmark publication that synthesizes for the first time the massive amount of research on historic mortuary archaeology, especially monuments, across America. An essential text for many archaeologists, art historians, and cultural anthropolgists.”–Harold Mytum, coeditor of Prisoners of War: Archaeology, Memory, and Heritage of 19th- and 20th-Century Mass Internment.

Gravestones, cemeteries, and memorial markers offer fixed points in time to examine Americans’ changing attitudes toward death and dying. In tracing the evolution of commemorative practices from the seventeenth century to the present, Sherene Baugher and Richard Veit offer insights into our transformation from a preindustrial and agricultural to an industrial, capitalist country.

Paying particular attention to populations often overlooked in the historical record–African Americans, Native Americans, and immigrant groups–the authors also address the legal, logistical, and ethical issues that confront field researchers who conduct cemetery excavations. Baugher and Veit reveal how gender, race, ethnicity, and class have shaped the cultural landscapes of burial grounds and summarize knowledge gleaned from the archaeological study of human remains and the material goods interred with the deceased.

From the practices of historic period Native American groups to elite mausoleums, and from almshouse mass graves to the rise in popularity of green burials today, The Archaeology of Cemeteries and Gravemarkers provides an overview of the many facets of this fascinating topic.

Cindy Kocik graduated, with thesis on Iroquois dendrochronology

CynthiaKocikCIAMSCIAMS Master’s student Cynthia Kocik was graduated in August 2014, having completed her thesis, “The Edges of Wood: Dendrochronological Analysis of Three Seneca Iroquois Structures at Letchworth State Park, 1796-1831.” Since graduating Cindy has been working at the Cornell Tree-Ring Laboratory and plans to do so into early 2015. Eventually she hopes to work in CRM or in an archaeology-related post with a state parks service or historical society in the Midwest. Congratulations, Cindy!

 

 

Manning and international team date climate change and collapse ca. 2200 BCE

Egyptian coffinClimate change caused empire’s fall, tree rings reveal
By Linda B. Glaser (photo:  Ipi-ha-ishutef’s coffin, S. Cristanetti, A. Whyte/Oriental Institute)
A handful of tree ring samples stored in an old cigar box have shed unexpected light on the ancient world, thanks to research by archaeologist Sturt Manning and collaborators at Cornell, Arizona, Chicago, Oxford and Vienna, forthcoming in the June issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science. Read more in the Cornell Chronicle…

CIAMS and Museum Practice

HFJ-Graduate-AlexMellon courses are curating interest in museum practice

[from the Cornell Chronicle] By Daniel Aloi

Students are learning the ins and outs of museum practice from a range of disciplinary perspectives in courses using Cornell resources in collaboration with the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art. “Connecting Research with Practice,” an initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, will ultimately spawn eight collection-based courses co-taught by Cornell faculty members and museum curators and educators. The courses feature class sessions in the museum, visits to campus laboratories, study trips and guest lecturers from Cornell and beyond. Read more in the Cornell Chronicle…

Chronicle: Smith’s Civilization Class Digs into Cornell Future

SmithClass4-28aClass examines Cornell past and future
By Linda B. Glaser (photo by Jason Koski/University Photography)

Anthropology professor Adam Smith instructs students during his “Rise and Fall of ‘Civilization’” class.
“Welcome to Cornell Ruins National Park,” Adam T. Smith tells his students. “We’re lucky today. We have a cache of objects to examine discovered in the ruins of McGraw Hall.” This “Rise and Fall of ‘Civilization’” class examines traditional archaeological topics, like kingship and the origins of cities, partly by looking at our current civilization through the lens of a single site – the Cornell campus as it would look 1,000 years from now. Read more…