Anthro Colloquium: Barbara Mills (University of Arizona)

Photo credit: Matthew Devitt (ASU)

Photo credit: Matthew Devitt (ASU)

The Cornell Departments of Anthropology and CIAMS present

Barbara Mills
University of Arizona
 
Migration, Skill, and the Transformation of Social Networks in the Prehispanic Southwest
Friday, February 19
3:30 p.m.
McGraw Hall 165

 
This event is free and open to the public. A reception will follow the talk.

Dr. Mills’s Bibliography:

I am an anthropological archaeologist with broad interests in archaeological method and theory, especially (but not exclusively) as applied to the North American Southwest.  My work has focused on ceramic analysis as a tool for understanding production, distribution, and consumption but more broadly is my interest in material culture to understand social relations in the past. My research on ceramic technology, craft specialization, and accumulations research led to a series of papers and edited volumes on social inequality, identity, feasting, and migration.  These interests were fostered by more than a decade of work in the Silver Creek area of east-central Arizona, including a multi-year collaborative project with the White Mountain Apache Tribe.  I also have field and research experience in a number of other areas of the Southwest including Zuni, Chaco, Mimbres, Grasshopper, and most recently the Greater Hohokam area.  Outside the U.S. I have research experience in Guatemala (Postclassic Maya), Kazakhstan (Bronze Age), and Turkey (Neolithic).  Besides ceramics I am interested in depositional practice, and how that can be used to understand memory, materiality, and relational logics.  Currently I am a PI on the Southwest Social Networks Project, which brings together data and a talented group of scholars to apply social network analysis (SNA) to archaeological data from a large area of the western Southwest. This ongoing project continues my interest in looking at the dynamics of social relations from a multiscalar perspective.